Huston’s sixteen principles: assessing operational performance during Op Desert Storm

By Chris Paparone. This article is interesting not only for its historical value, but in the way Chris Paparone utilised the sixteen principles of logistics derived from the classic American history of Army logistics, Dr James Huston's The Sinews of War: Army Logistics 1775-1953. The book was written soon after the conclusion of the Korean War… Continue reading Huston’s sixteen principles: assessing operational performance during Op Desert Storm

Organising logistics for Multi-Domain Battle: Making a Complex Problem Even More Complex

This article was prepared as part of a collaboration with 'Over The Horizon: Multi-domain operations and strategies', a blog which asks the question, 'what comes after the Joint and inter-agency constructs?' The article can also be found here.  If you haven't followed OTH via their main website, or on Facebook, you are missing a great… Continue reading Organising logistics for Multi-Domain Battle: Making a Complex Problem Even More Complex

‘Cunctator’ Part 2: Siege warfare and the logistics of resistance – lessons from Croatia and Iraq

By Erik A. Claessen. This post continues from ‘Cunctator’ – Logistics, hostile environments and war in cities. In 2006 – three years into Operation Iraqi Freedom – the US Army recognised: "People support the source that meets their needs."[1] This was a confirmation that people would not intuitively support a military force which liberated them from a… Continue reading ‘Cunctator’ Part 2: Siege warfare and the logistics of resistance – lessons from Croatia and Iraq

Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – a new expedition, and new expectations

By David Beaumont. This post continues the ‘Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics’ series, and is an abridged extract from a larger paper. The operations in East Timor are commonly seen to be a litmus test of Army’s logistic capability, and the primary reason for a second wave of logistic transformation. Operation Warden certainly gave good… Continue reading Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – a new expedition, and new expectations

Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – sustaining INTERFET

‘In the past the Australian armed forces have not had to invest in substantial deployable logistic capabilities. Our forces have relied upon major allies such as the US and Britain. The logistic support for INTERFET was magnificent, but sustainment was not achieved without frustration and some failures. Frankly, if the ADF is required by the… Continue reading Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – sustaining INTERFET

‘Cunctator’ – Logistics, hostile environments and war in cities

By Erik A. Claessen. In 216 BC, a Carthaginian army, commanded by Hannibal, crossed the Alps and invaded the region now known as Italy. In a series of spectacular victories, Hannibal annihilated the Roman armed forces. Military academies worldwide still cite his victory at Cannae as the textbook example of decisive battle. However, they rarely… Continue reading ‘Cunctator’ – Logistics, hostile environments and war in cities

The trust deficit – why do we expect logistics to fail us?

By Gabrielle M. Follett. Trust. The willingness of a party to be vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular action important to the trustor, irrespective of the ability of the ability to monitor or control that other party[1]. In a recent post in 'From… Continue reading The trust deficit – why do we expect logistics to fail us?

Logistics and the strangling of strategy

By David Beaumont. Logistics has long been recognised as vital to a force, but when inefficient a constraint on that force’s freedom to manoeuvre. However, the impact of logistics on strategy is just as significant and ultimately more profound. The modern fixation on high-velocity, nominally ‘efficient’, and usually ‘globalised’ supply chains have introduced significant operational… Continue reading Logistics and the strangling of strategy

Structuring logistics for unstructured war

By Chris Paparone. In the October 2014 issue of The Journal of Military History, Robert W. Hutchinson published his illuminating article subtitled, “Wehrmacht Officers, the U.S. Army Historical Division, and U.S. Military Doctrine, 1945–1956.”  Hutchinson tells the story about how, “…over 700 former field and staff officers of the German Armed Forces…closely collaborated with the… Continue reading Structuring logistics for unstructured war

Intellectual irrelevance and the ownership of military logistics

By David Beaumont The professionalisation of logisticians is a topic that has once again emerged, as strategic-level organisations in a number of different militaries seek to improve, and ‘intellectualise’, military logistics.  The desire for ‘intellectualisation’ appeals to one of the three pillars of Samuel Huntington’s criteria of a profession – expertise – in addition to… Continue reading Intellectual irrelevance and the ownership of military logistics