‘Cunctator’ – Logistics, hostile environments and war in cities

By Erik A. Claessen. In 216 BC, a Carthaginian army, commanded by Hannibal, crossed the Alps and invaded the region now known as Italy. In a series of spectacular victories, Hannibal annihilated the Roman armed forces. Military academies worldwide still cite his victory at Cannae as the textbook example of decisive battle. However, they rarely… Continue reading ‘Cunctator’ – Logistics, hostile environments and war in cities

Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – defending Australia in the 1980s and 1990s

By David Beaumont. This post continues the 'Transforming the Australian Army's logistics' series, and is an abridged extract from a larger paper. As much as we might like to think that militaries change because of strategic necessity and transformative concepts, they are also beholden to a variety of social, economic and institutional influences. The developmental… Continue reading Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics – defending Australia in the 1980s and 1990s

Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics

By David Beaumont. Some may recall from earlier posts on 'Logistics In War' that in late 2016, the Chief of the Australian Army, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell, challenged the senior logisticians of the Australian Army to 'revolutionise' Army's logistics. This was not because sustainment operations were not successfully happening, nor was it a condemnation of… Continue reading Transforming the Australian Army’s logistics

Learning and training to get it right – what environment are we preparing Army logisticians for?

By Michael Lane. It has been said that origins of modern logistics were adopted from the military. This implies that at some point in time military logisticians were the leaders in logistics thinking and by extension logistics training. However, where the military were once logistics thought leaders it can be argued that this is no… Continue reading Learning and training to get it right – what environment are we preparing Army logisticians for?

The ‘Headquarters Snowball’

By David Beaumont. The scale of logistics and the size of headquarters are routinely considered alongside one another because of the belief that smaller headquarters and logistics forces means more combat troops and, more importantly, efficient processes. This can be seen at the organisational level; most militaries have experienced periods of reform where efficiency-seeking impacts… Continue reading The ‘Headquarters Snowball’

From the ‘swamp’ to the ‘high-ground’ and back – educating logisticians to operate in complexity: Part Two

By Dr. Chris Paparone and George L. Topic In part one of 'From the swamp to the high-ground and back', Chris Paparone and George Topic questioned the methodology applied to the education of military logisticians. In concluding part one, it was posed: We need to focus much less on the 'what' of education (that should… Continue reading From the ‘swamp’ to the ‘high-ground’ and back – educating logisticians to operate in complexity: Part Two

From the ‘swamp’ to the ‘high-ground’ and back – educating logisticians to operate in complexity: Part One

By Dr. Chris Paparone and George L. Topic The difficulty and complexity of the post-industrial military profession at all levels is so profound and widely recognized that it is almost cliché to mention. This is true for all specialties, but few are more challenging than the field of logistics especially as leaders reach higher levels… Continue reading From the ‘swamp’ to the ‘high-ground’ and back – educating logisticians to operate in complexity: Part One

Commercial acumen – the missing link in the training of ADF logisticians: Part Two

By Carney Elias. In an earlier post, I argued that Defence must become better at developing commercial acumen in logisticians. This assertion was made on the basis of my experiences within the Australian Army. In keeping with the fundamental principles of education and training used across Defence, to develop the commercial acumen of logisticians we… Continue reading Commercial acumen – the missing link in the training of ADF logisticians: Part Two

Commercial acumen – the missing link in the training of ADF logisticians: Part One

By Carney Elias. '[T]he procurement process itself is a weapon of war no less significant than the guns, the airplanes, and the rockets turned out by the arsenals of democracy.' I.B. Holley[1] The 2015 edition of the Macquarie Dictionary defines acumen as quickness of perception; mental acuteness; keen insight and commercial as 'being engaged in… Continue reading Commercial acumen – the missing link in the training of ADF logisticians: Part One